Tuesday, January 17, 2006

Things that Apply to me; In Gold


is a renaming or realigning of a group of persons who have been labelled in the recent past as
Aspergers Syndrome (AS)
or High Functioning Autistic (HFA)
or Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD)
or who have otherwise gone undiagnosed.
Items is Green; Agree less so.
Items in Light Blue; Disagree.
A check list of possible symptoms

or manifestations for persons in pre-diagnosis or persons already diagnosed with:

Autistic Continuum Disorder Including High Functioning Autism (HFA)
Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD),
& Asperger's Syndrome (AS)
Pervasive Developmental Disorder -- not otherwise specified (PDD - NOS)
This is a partial list of observable behaviors and conditions exhibited by Autistic continuum persons.
It can be used for assessing elementary school aged youth up through adults.
Not every comment is applicable to every crypto-sensitive person.
It is assumed that perhaps 1/4 or more of these symptoms could be noticed by a concerned,
long time, casual observer who has seen the crypto-sensitive person in a variety of circumstances.
The statements have been selected with persons in mind who are somewhat sociable
and somewhat educable.
This list is not intended to describe low functioning,
non-communicable autistics who may have other multiple handicaps
and hence may be mute as well as extremely withdrawn or ego-centric.
Crypto Sensitivity Syndrome
Social Interaction
Limited integration into any social group at any time

Limited success in naming the emotions involved in facial expressions be they demonstrated, in a photo, or hand drawn, even with sound effects included
May resist looking at photos of self or family or aquaintances
May become completely engrossed and physically excited (well beyond the typical reaction) in the exciting (to them) part of a movie, TV program, or cartoon
May, during a film or TV show, leave the room, keep the head and eyes averted, or hide own face with paper or hands during the emotional or sex related parts
Finds social taboos hard to understand
Behavior in public tends to stay exactly the same as behavior in private
Retains some behaviors easily overlooked in someone younger
Ritually learned politeness may result in a faux pas or unintended insult to others
Not adept at deceiving, nor impressing, others
Innocent, honest, guileless, naive
Not manipulative, not gossipy (but may tell anecdotes)
No strong feelings for possessions and can give to others gladly (but will have strong feelings for specialty collections of a favorite obsession)
Though not empathizing in the regular sense of the word, they do not gloat over others' misfortune
Can be profoundly upset by others' suffering
Can show righteous indignation
Cannot "read between the lines" to know when they are not welcome
Often badly teased and tormented by their normal peers
When expressing joy, fear, anger, or other moods, it is often out of synchrony with social expectations
Can be made miserable by a petty reprimand ('your fingers are sticky'), yet ignore an important one ('get off the road')
Rather than gaze avoidance, their "gaze" is not used correctly in communication, either by looking away at the wrong time, or by failing to meet another's gaze at the right time
Exhibits little or no repertoire of "eye language", e.g. no attempt or else failed attempts or "mixed message" attempts at giving looks of scorn, surprise, pleading, triumph, glaring, seduction, mocking
Lacks turn-taking skills in conversations (an ability which usually is controlled by eye gestures)
Inability to form ordinary affective contact with people
Inability to relate in the ordinary way to people and situations
An aloneness that, whenever possible, shuts out, disregards, ignores anything that comes from the outside environment
Has good relationship with "objects" and is interested in them, even for long periods of time
Does not seek to be comforted when distressed, injured, sick
May not complain about being ill, thirsty, picked on
May be quite dependable about keeping appointments, paying bills, following a routine, etc. as long as complicating changes do not arise
May do adequate housework, but may be oblivious as to when it again needs to be done
May seldom, if ever, ask for food, drink, restroom, more heating, warmer clothing, other similar necessities, or even sweets
May take little part in deciding itineraries or other family plans
Will lead the conversation away from the important matters of the moment, e.g. graduation plans, and lead the conversation to the "favorite topic".
Will not "problem solve" or brain storm with peers for mutual help, sharing of expertise, insight, or knowledge, e.g. figuring out what classes to schedule for the next semester
Rarely shows violence of the kind where one person dominates another, though may defend self vigorously
Sexual offending is rare, though poor "mating" skills can embarrass the opposite sex
Property offenses are rare except when they are side-effects of pursuit of a special interest
Sits or stands on the periphery of a social group or even has back turned to the group
Physical and emotional resistance to change in daily routine or ritual routine

A small, seemingly insignificant change in orderliness can be disproportionately more disturbing than a much greater change (A lamp table moved one foot can elicit a more greatly agitated reaction than installing a new bookcase or painting the room.)
In those with stereotyped behaviors, personal noises and motions produced are as monotonous in tone and content or as repetitive as any verbal utterances
Marked limitation to the variety and number of spontaneous normal activities
Anxious, obsessive desire for the maintenance of sameness
Even though perhaps seeming to be untidy, will have "a place for everything and everything in its place"
Repetitiveness, single-mindedness, pedantry
Inability to judge the significance of subtle differences in another person's words or behavior, i.e. voice tone, facial expression, body English of others will be received with less accuracy, or no accuracy, of intended meaning. "Clean up that mess," whether said with disgust or glee or anger may be assessed as exactly the same message.
Performance of simple repetitive movements, repetitive utterances, and repetitive topics
Elaborate routines, without apparent purpose, demonstrated in action, language, or thought
Pursuit of narrower, usually obscure, topics of interest than members of the general public, and a preoccupation with that topic almost to the exclusion of everything else
Lack of, or lack of initiation of, imaginative play such as: pretending that a rock is a truck, a bucket is a garage; or pretend sailing on the sea with cardboard as the boat; flying with a cape like superman
Use of a toy will be very elementary such as merely spinning the wheel of a truck or merely lining up, over and over, a row of toys
A favorite topic may be "stage-center" for about two years; however, the transition to the new topic of interest may be so smooth, as well as being similar to the old topic, that one assumes the original topic is still active, e.g. the interest transfers from train schedules (when and where they run currently) to train schedule history (when and where they used to run).
Area-scores on an IQ test vary dramatically may excel at block design + pattern puzzles

Inconsistency of abilities: may, for instance, attain high scores and show excellent tactics in the game of "Scrabble", yet have a very poor level of spelling
Will show increased adaptability and compensation for "shortcomings" with increasing age
Astounding vocabulary at early age (of early speaking or reading children)
May have excellent memory for events of several years before
Short term moment-to-moment, hour-to-hour memory is usually poor.
May have poor recall for names, places, faces (except in the case of the favorite topic)
May have phenomenal rote memory for poems, names, product specifications, player statistics, etc.
May have precise recollection of complex patterns and sequences
Particular originality of thought and experience in narrow fields leading perhaps to exceptional achievement
Not at all geared to learning from adults or teachers -- self-taught in non-traditional personalized ways
Isolated, restricted, or circumscribed areas of interest
Possible excellent ability for logical, abstract thinking
May have good deductive reasoning
Poor inductive reasoning
Does not generalize well
Poor abductive reasoning
Original word and moniker creation (calling someone or some item by a movie character's name or by a made up name, etc.)
Intellectual prowess with large and deep knowledge in narrow areas (e.g., W.W.II tanks, Italian Opera, dog breeds of England)
Patchy patterns of intellectual achievement (e.g., Excellent reading and comprehension and vast factual knowledge and perhaps even a prolific writer, but, on the other hand, unaware of the difference between active and passive voice of verbs, or even unable to point out a verb in a sentence, or poor spelling and handwriting)
More interested in the factual, statistical aspects of an endeavor, or topic, or book
More interest in technology rather than people
May spend long periods of time on computer, preferring to delve into its inner workings and file organization rather than do work required for school
A lack of interest in typical fictional stories with real life characters, a plot, emotions, etc.
May not do well at sports requiring excellent gross motor coordination such as baseball or football, but may do adequately well or excel in individual endurance sports such as running or swimming
Prefers the computer, a book, or other inanimate learning tool over being with people and often is good at computer and reading
Although some may have unusual or specific math abilities, generally will not do well in standard math classes.
May have clumsy looking, large, and poorly formed handwriting and numerals
Some may be good readers, yet poor spellers
Four times as likely to be left handed as general population
Higher incidence of ambidexterity
Somewhat naive, may be easily led astray or conned

May not like to be touched, hugged, or even stood near { i like tickling! }
May find bodily compression (prolonged bear hugs, lying down on them) to be soothing
Impairment of ordinary two-way communication is always present
Not on same "wave-length" as peers in any group activity
Although not alone physically, is alone mentally
May be quite takative to a captive audience..., such as a store clerk
...{ i am learning Not to do this...!!! }
Tends to accept the "literal" meaning of a communication rather than the figurative, e.g."Boy, did I have egg on my face yesterday," evokes a mental image of yellow yolk on the speaker's face. "He's a man of many hats," would be heard as meaning literally that the man must have dozens of hats when the true figurative intended meaning is that the man plays many roles in life: father, businessman, athlete, lay-preacher, and diplomat.
Lack of, or misuse of, adequate common gestures, body language, and facial expression
Will talk on a favorite subject, oblivious to the listener's lack of interest or waning interest
Will guide, or abruptly switch, a conversation to favorite topic and proceed to dominate
Gives matter-of-fact, honest, short answers with little or no elaboration
An elaborate answer often assumes far too much priorly acquired knowledge within the listener (assumes the listener has as much or more expertise and "insider knowledge" as himself)
Use of language may appear abnormal in context
May be already thoroughly trained to look at the eyes of whoever is talking to them, but it does not come naturally and the eye contact will seem a bit unnatural or blank
Some command over Instrumental Gestures, which are designed to get someone to do something immediately, e.g. 'Quiet' (finger to the lips), 'Look up' (point up with a finger), 'Come here' (swing bent arm toward one's chest or else index finger flexing motion)
Seldom makes nor understands genuine and appropriate Expressive Gestures, which always contain emotional components, e.g. an offer of friendship (an outreached hand and smile), a threat (a clenched fist and frown), embarrassment (head lowered with eyes straight ahead with a weak smile or eyes lowered)
Good comprehension of "Mechanical Stories" (balloon is let go, it floats toward tree, it bursts on a branch) and "Behavioral Stories" (child is given money, goes to store, buys candy, leaves store, eats candy) Poor comprehension of "Mentalistic Stories", where, to understand the real meaning of the story, it is important to comprehend the character's "state of mind", such as does an event or condition in the story make the character be happy, sad, surprised, melancoly, indignant, etc. and how would that emotional reaction effect the "texture" or the outcome of the story
Prefers to be alone, but can maintain a relationship with caregiver
Odd usage of language
A more literal interpretation of questioning: e.g., if asked "Do you read? (for fun)" elicits a response of "Yes. (meaning, literally, the ability to read)" or "Do you read magazines?" elicits "No" even though hours per day may be spend "looking" at magazines (not actually literally "reading" them)

{ i'm tend more towards confusion with these sorts of questions...??? }
Lack of meaningful, two-way communication despite having adequate speech or even being talkative
May be aloof, or else have pestering or obnoxious talk, or else odd talk
May be verbally passive and compliant
Gives a "correct" and very literal, but not very relevant, answer to a question, e.g. 'Can you pass the salt?', 'Yes' (But with no concept of actually passing it)
Will seem to lack common sense Questions requiring precise information on a favorite topic are answered faultlessly with elaboration May use (or misuse) rare or pedantic words when listener expects or needs the simple version
May use the less common or British pronunciation of a word, or else purposefully shift the accentuation, or else a sound within a word, e.g. infatuation becomes inflatuation
May use the uncommon or British word choice, e.g. "W.C." for toilet, yet be repelled by the not so uncommon American (naval) usage of "head"
May casually and stubbornly use the less common Celsius, metric system, or 24 hour clock
In highly verbal persons, correct usage of pronouns does not guarantee adequate comprehension when they hear others speak using pronouns
May use pronouns without having established an antecedent; it sounds like logical English, but the listener has no idea what subject is being spoken about
Idiosyncratic language, e.g. women are "lassies", or saucepan is a "water boiling unit"
Delay in language development, late talker, or curious, atypical development of speech
May be so eloquently talkative as a toddler that it attracts widespread attention in public
Eloquent speech, fine use of language, excellent vocabulary, humor, etc. may on closer appraisal be seen to be pedantry or "little professor" lecturing and not true, person-to-person communication
Most often handsome to average in appearance

Usually quiet-spoken, polite, genteel
Adequate grooming may deteriorate when not monitored
Clothing choice may seem odd-ball, mismatched, shabby or inappropriate if not monitored
A characteristic peculiarity of gaze: somewhat blank stare, or looking-through-you
Sometimes a lack of eye contact or predominantly peripheral viewing
May have one eye noticeably weaker, perhaps even crossed
Seems to take in things with short peripheral glances
Body English may say to others that the person is being sneaky, or sly, or secretive or aloof.
Poverty of facial expression and gestures
More negative facial expressions than warranted, or blank, or odd mixtures of both negative and positive facial components
Stereotypic movements that don't express meaning
Fungus growth under fingernails or toenails, or unnoticeable fungus (yeast) on scalp, or in the intestines or vagina, etc.
Follows own impulses regardless of the demands of the environment or social situation
May exhibit clumsiness in gross motor skills, while seemingly dexterous with fine motor tasks like the ability to balance objects
Tends to express no attitude toward own accomplishments or own failures
May abruptly end a conversation by merely turning away, walking away, or saying "Work time", "Play time", "Good-bye", "Got to Go" etc. in a matter-of-fact way
Echolalia, which is the repeating back of another's words, be it from TV or a book or a friend, e.g. "How are you doing?" response: "How are you doing?" Echolalia may take the form of pedantry or "little professor" lectures on the favorite topic giving the impression in the very young of precociousness or genius
Mood may evolve with passage of years, for example, from attempts at socializing, especially during teen years, to a more aloof attitude when no longer forced into social settings
May become the "class clown" in an effort to socialize, being somewhat oblivious to the reactions or feelings of others
May dress, talk, or act in socially inappropriate ways in an effort to attract friends and attain "normal" socializing Idiosyncratic (not used by average people) body and hand gestures
May mimic the other persons facial expressions and body English during a conversation, but the mimicry is devoid of any real connection to his own side of the conversation both long and short lapses into silence
Possess few facial expressions with slightly more negative expressions on face as well as often incongruous mismatches of part negative and part positive facial expression
Sometimes monotone or contextually monotonous speech
Uses narrower range of speaking tones, as well as fewer tones (3), than normal (~5)
Stiff or wooden body posture
When young, the "feel" of the child sitting on your lap may be different from the "feel" of other children, i.e. somewhat listless, heavy, like a sack of potatoes, not cuddly
Seldom points out objects to others in order to share attention of that object with the other person
Does not necessarily avoid social stimuli and formal or informal invitations to participate
Does make attachments to parents and others
A tendency to assume that others know exactly what they themselves know
Good control of conventional logic
Tendency to avoid fiction reading in preference for non-fiction, especially lists and facts such as found in almanacs or perhaps technology, such as computers
Can be a good conversationalist, but inevitably hogs the conversation with little aptitude for conversational give and take
Cannot discuss complex associations, or social relationships, between two or more people
May exhibit tics, such as muscular jerks, verbal grunts, spontaneous utterance of a word or phrase
The Five Senses
Either hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity may be present for any one specific sense and may reverse briefly or permanently

May prefer the roughness of wool clothing and blankets or, on the other hand, may insist on only smooth, wrinkle-free, seam-free, slick, smooth clothing and sheets
May prefer very spicy food, perhaps going heavy on mustard, catsup, vinegar, pepper, hot sauce, etc. or, on the other hand, may only be able to eat the blandest of food
May overdress or, on the other hand, underdress for the current temperature
Most will recoil from the touch of a person's hand, especially from behind or when unexpected
Most will be sensitive to glaring lights, bright sun, bright overcast sky
Most will be sensitive to loud noise, especially sudden, and certain tones may be more irritating than other tones
Some may appreciate certain varieties of music, yet consider other music mere noise
May be somewhat insensitive to the pain of injuries like cuts, scrapes, bruises, bumps
May withstand thirst and hunger and tiredness without complaint
May not complain when sick in general, be it a fever, upset stomach, etc.
May be very leary of carnival rides, playground equipment, balls
May have eyesight perception problems
May be resistive of getting haircuts from just anyone or may cut own hair
Difficulty intellectually and physically in knowing where their own body leaves off and the surrounding environment begins, especially when younger
Sensual perception such as eyesight difficulties and tactile difficulties may exacerbate gross motor clumsiness
Visual / Spatial
Difficulty shifting attention between, as well as within, modalities

The beam of attention is reduced, thereby restricting what can be attended to at any one moment of time.
Problem in disengaging visual attention or shifting visual attention over short time intervals
Over-focused attention may be a behavioral manifestation of difficulties moving attention at will (Over-focused attention refers to where in space attention is located and the ease with which it can get there or away, and not simply to the magnitude of that attentional focus)
Abnormalities in moving attention through space
Responds faster to central, rather than lateral, stimuli
Probably not good at catching balls
Poor judgment of distances, curves, trajectories, etc.
May not drive a car well, or drives seldom, or not at all through own choice
{ i felft that i was Too Confident when driving...??? }
Difficulty recognizing people they should readily recognize
Difficulty picking out people they know well from a single photo or a group picture
Clumsiness, stiffness, or akwardness in body movements dependent on sight

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